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 Causes of self-doubt

 

 

 

There are several complementary explanations for the causes of self-doubt. The simplest explanation comes from Albert Bandura's "model learning" theory.


 By this theory, a new repertoire of aggressive, confident or insecure behavior skills arises as a result of imitation - copying by the child of those behavioral stereotypes that he has the opportunity to observe around him.


 Parents, relatives, friends serve as "models" for copying. As a result, a confident, aggressive or insecure personality appears as a kind of "cast" of patterns of behavior that dominate in the environment surrounding the child.

 

Causes of self-doubt


Another equally popular explanation for uncertainty is Martin Seligman's "learned helplessness" theory. 


He suggested that the formation of a child's personality is influenced not only by the "models" serving for copying, but also by the reaction of parents, and more broadly, by the entire surrounding social environment, to one or another behavior of the child. 


This feedback allows (or does not allow) the child to correlate different stereotypes of social behavior with different reactions of the social environment. 


The nature of the relationship between the child's behavior patterns and the reaction of the environment (the behavior of the parents) determines the positive, healthy, or impaired development of the child. In the second case, the so-called "learned helplessness" can arise.

 

Seligman defines helplessness as a state that occurs in a situation where external events are independent of us and we can do nothing to prevent or modify them. The feeling of helplessness arises when external events proceed completely independently of our voluntary actions (objective conditions of helplessness), or if it seems to us that they proceed independently of us (subjective conditions). 


As a result of the conjugation in time of active voluntary actions and uncontrollable consequences, a sad result arises - motivation for any action that involves changes in the external environment is lost.

 

So, learned helplessness occurs when a child either does not receive any response to his actions at all (a situation, for example, of an orphanage, where the attention of educators is distributed to a large number of children); either receives monotonous negative ("they will still be punished") or monotonous positive ("mama's son") feedback.

 

Further, another explanation for the lack of confidence may be the lack or lack of faith in the effectiveness of their actions.


 Low self-efficiency arises as a result of massive negative assessments from loved ones and teachers, which subsequently transform into negative self-assessments of their intentions and capabilities. These negative self-assessments block, on the one hand, social initiative,

 

From the explanations given for the reasons for uncertainty, it does not follow in any way that self-confidence is inherent, so to speak, from birth. A child is born with some inclinations and abilities, possibly with some physical or mental disabilities.


 These inclinations, abilities and shortcomings facilitate or complicate the task of socialization, but do not directly and directly determine the formation of the level of self-confidence. 


At the initial stage of socialization, many factors play a role in the formation of confidence, but first of all, a variety of opportunities for acquiring (copying, teaching) new social skills and a variety of adequate and immediate reactions to these skills of the social environment.

 

Otherwise, there is a "negative" option - the formation of uncertainty. The social environment in which a future insecure person is born is extremely poor in impressions and monotonous. 


The repertoire of skills that are available for observation and copying is very limited. The social environment, the reactions of parents or caregivers are also monotonous and mostly negative. 


Achievements and successes in mastering this environment are not obvious, denied or criticized. 


Negative feedback (or no feedback at all) constantly causes feelings of failure. Negative self-assessments and expectations of failure become habitual ways of internal dialogue and lead to a rejection of their initiative in mastering new aspects of reality, passivity and timidity in the implementation of their intentions. 


As a result, an insecure person achieves less in life, life itself, any form of activity for him is associated with a mass of negative experiences, these experiences, in turn, affect the health of the person himself and his loved ones.


 In a broader context, a society or organization in which insecure people live and work lacks the initiative of its members. In such a society or organization, stagnation dominates, too much energy is wasted on useless discussions and doubts.


 Reasonable cooperation of people for the implementation of common intentions does not arise, everyone lives within their own (rather painful) world. 


In a broader context, a society or organization in which insecure people live and work lacks the initiative of its members. 


In such a society or organization, stagnation dominates, too much energy is wasted on useless discussions and doubts.


 Reasonable cooperation of people for the implementation of common intentions does not arise, everyone lives within their own (rather painful) world.


 In a broader context, a society or organization in which insecure people live and work lacks the initiative of its members. 


In such a society or organization, stagnation dominates, too much energy is wasted on useless discussions and doubts. 


Reasonable cooperation of people for the implementation of common intentions does not arise, everyone lives within their own (rather painful) world.

Vladimir Romek

 

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